My favorite herb – Pau D’arco (By Nicole Noles, DOM LMT)

Pau d’arco is my favorite herb, hands down. According to my favorite go-to book for herbs, “20,000 Secrets Of Tea” by Victoria Jak, pau d’arco is anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-yeast, anti-microbial, anti-tumor and anti-fungal. It contains calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, vitamin A, the B-complex vitamins, and vitamin C. This can be a good tea to drink if you need to build blood after your menses, keep candida or herpes outbreaks under control, are fighting off a cold or flu, or need to clear out mucous.

I keep pau d’arco in my house at all times. I keep a plain jar, and a jar mixed with a 50-50 blend of pau d’arco and echinacea purpura leaf. My kids know that if they bring any sort of nasty home from school, they’ll be drinking the pau d’arco / echinacea blend morning, noon and night as a hot or iced tea. They rarely stay home more than a day if they drink their tea. (Sometimes I think they skip drinking their tea on purpose though!)

For people on the candida diet, this is the one beverage that is usually allowed besides water. And for those of you battling toenail fungus, you can soak your toes daily in a strong tea after it’s cooled to a tolerable temperature. Some people choose to just apply the pau d’arco tincture for convenience, which works just as well. I’ve seen some patients in the clinic use it on slow-healing sores where sweat created a lesion in moist folds, too. If you’re diabetic, though, you should consult a doctor about any skin lesion before trying pau d’arco or any alternative treatment.

WARNING: Pau d’arco has caused or is associated with fetal damage, although it is compatible with breastfeeding. Lactating women should use with caution under supervision and pregnant women or those trying to conceive should abstain from pau d’arco. It can also interact with blood thinners (The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety, 2005).

In any case, it’s always wise to see your doctor first for any medical condition, but keeping pau d’arco in your kitchen cabinet may help you fight off a cold or flu the next time it visits your neighborhood.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician and licensed massage therapist in Florida, as well as the editor of the Port Charlotte Herald, a full-color premium weekly insert to the Charlotte Sun. Nicole has two bachelor’s degrees – Alternative Medicine and Public Health – as well as a master’s degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine. She has a passion for both writing and natural health. Please visit her website at www.pcacupuncture.abmp.com and like her Facebook page at Vitalichi Acupuncture at New Hope Chiropractic.

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