Chinese Medicine can help recovery from shingles

Acupuncture and allopathic medicine can help you recover from shingles.

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Green tea has good science to support health benefits

Tea isn’t just for scones and English breakfasts. This beverage, steeped in history and ritual (pun intended) is the subject of daily consumption not only in American and European nations, but also in Asia. Although tea does not get its own pillar in the five pillars of Chinese Medicine, it is included in the first pillar of Diet. You could make the argument that it also belongs in the fourth pillar of Herbal Medicine because it functions not just a dietary beverage but a medicinal compound as well.

Many patients inquire about the health benefits of various supplements and teas, and about green tea specifically. So here’s an abbreviated look at some recent studies on the effects of green tea on various conditions:

• A study published this month concludes that “long-term dietary intake of Artemisia extracts and/or green tea extracts can be an effective strategy either to rejuvenate H. pylori atrophic gastritis or to suppress tumorigenesis” helping to heal the digestive tract. (1)

• A paper published last month found “the 10-year prospective cohort study by Drs. K. Nakachi and K. Imai revealed that drinking 10 Japanese-size cups (120 mL/cup) of green tea per day delayed cancer onset in humans by 7.3 years among females and by 3.2 years among males.” (2)

• In January, a results from a study on melanoma “suggest(ed) that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) induce a marked disruption of the uncontrolled cell cycle progression, and that may be a mechanism by which GTPs inhibit the proliferation or suppress the cell viability of melanoma cells.” (3)

• Another study published in January comparing irradiation verses green tea polyphenols “indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation.” (4)

• An abstract released in February concluded that “experimental data indicated that EGCG (the bioactive component of green tea) treatment suppresses cell proliferation of SSC-4 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).” (5)

• Last February, a study of elderly rats that had a hind limb immobilized for two weeks had better muscle recovery of the plantaris, a fast muscle, although it didn’t help the soleus, a slow muscle. (6)

• Results from a study last October found “long-term administration of cigarette smoke altered the cellular antioxidant defense system, induced apoptosis in lung tissue, inflammation and damage in liver, lung, and kidney. All these pathophysiological and biochemical events were significantly improved when the cigarette smoke-exposed albino rats were given Chinese green tea (CGT) infusion as a drink instead of water.” The specific green tea variety used in this study is Lung Chen. (7)

• A study published back in 2011 found “epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, 0·05 % in drinking-water), the primary polyphenolic component in green tea, effectively delayed the onset of Type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.” (8)

Most of these studies were done on rats and mice, but it provides a broad spectrum of potential health benefits of humans. At the very least, moderate daily consumption of green tea won’t hurt. The biggest concern with green tea intake seem to be too much. Here’s what rxdrugs.com has to say about possible side effects:

“Green tea is safe for most adults. Green tea extract seems to be safe for most people for short-term use. In some people, green tea can cause stomach upset and constipation. Green tea extracts have been reported to cause liver problems.

“Too much green tea, such as more than five cups per day, can cause side effects because of the caffeine. These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, convulsions, and confusion. Green tea seems to reduce the absorption of iron from food.” (http://www.rxlist.com/green_tea/supplements.htm)

Like any change in your diet, talk to your health professionals to see if green tea consumption is appropriate for you. But it is generally regarded as safe. Moderation and proper preparation are the keys to getting health benefits from green tea.

My fiance, who is a smoker, frequently brewed Lung Ching green tea to give out as samples when he sold loose tea at the local farmers markets. Clearly that was a good choice for him as well. Since we are both serious about tea quality, we always recommend loose tea infused in a strainer that allows the individual leaves to unfurl and steep properly. When brewed at the range of 122 to 180 degrees for a minute, a good quality green tea can be brewed multiple times from the same serving. Preparing green tea in the traditional Chinese way ensures a good tasting tea that isn’t bitter. Steeping a green tea for too long or too hot ruins the tea and isn’t worth drinking. If caffeine is a concern, we recommend discarding the first brew and drinking the subsequent brews. This works for any caffeinated tea, by the way.

With dozens of varieties of green tea available, good health is just a cup away.

Pubmed studies on the benefits of green tea
1. Helicobacter. 2015 Apr 10: Dietary Intervention of Artemisia and Green Tea Extracts to Rejuvenate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Chronic Atrophic Gastritis and to Prevent Tumorigenesis.
2. J Cancer Prev. 2015 Mar: Primary cancer prevention by green tea, and tertiary cancer prevention by the combination of green tea catechins and anticancer compounds.
3. Genes Cancer. 2015 Jan: Polyphenols from green tea inhibit the growth of melanoma cells through inhibition of class I histone deacetylases and induction of DNA damage.
4. Neural Regen Res. 2015 Jan: Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation.
5. Onco Targets Ther. 2015 Feb 20: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis and autophagy in oral cancer SSC-4 cells.
6. Exp Gerontol. 2014 Feb: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats.
7. Iran J Basic Med Sci. 2014 Oct: Chinese green tea consumption reduces oxidative stress, inflammation and tissues damage in smoke exposed rats.
8. Br J Nutr. 2011 Apr: Epigallocatechin gallate delays the onset of type 1 diabetes in spontaneous non-obese diabetic mice.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com or call 941-766-1882.

Auricular medicine offers needle-free acupuncture on the go

Auricular therapy is a fancy term for placing needles, plant seeds or crystals in or on the ear based on reflex points. Similar to Western reflexology, which uses the feet as a road map for the body, auricular medicine uses the ear as a map of the human body.

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Chinese Medicine is more than just needles

Say the word acupuncture, and immediately many people conjure up an image of pincushion patients with needles sticking out of them from every direction. And don’t forget the pain. Acupuncture is supposed to be really painful, right? The reality is that acupuncture is just one branch of the Chinese Medicine umbrella, and it’s not even the most important branch. Needling a patient is the most visible form of Chinese Medicine, but there is much more going on behind the scenes. An acupuncture physician not only treats patients with acupuncture, but educates patients on the five pillars of Chinese Medicine in order of importance: Diet, exercise, bodywork, herbal medicine and acupuncture.

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Honoring Alice Snow

By Megan Smith

Lake Tupke Lake Tupke

Nestled between an exotic Caribbean garden and the colorful native Florida plant life at the Naples Botanical Garden is Lake Tupke, a charming man-made lake that has been named after the Seminole Medicine Carrier, Alice Snow. The lake, a year in the making, was a restoration of the native Florida Everglades environment which had become overgrown with invasive plant life.  The lake was officially opened last November 15 with a naming ceremony attended by Tribal members and other dignitaries. The chirping of native birds that have made their way back to the garden, the bubbling of fountains, and quiet cobblestone walkways filled with mosaics make this quaint garden the perfect place to honor such an inspiring Seminole tribal member.

Plants in the garden Plants in the garden

Alice Snow was born in 1922, on the outskirts of Lake Okeechobee, where she grew up living in a village beneath the…

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Kick your butts to the curb

Now is always the best time to quit smoking. Chinese medicine can help kick your butts to the curb and mitigate the oxidative damage that smoking causes.
With the five pillars of health, your acupuncture physician can help guide you through your journey to wean off nicotine.

There are many supportive lifestyle changes you can make to help ease the journey.

Diet

In Chinese medicine, the theory goes that smoking creates a dry type of heat in the lungs, which is not good for health. For current smokers and new quitters, I recommend they consume organic pears and apples, which replenishes the moisture the lungs need to function properly.

Some studies have found quitters who ate more servings of salads or fruits and vegetables in general had better quit rates. Either way, that’s not a bad diet recommendation.
Smoking depletes antioxidants, so current and former smokers need more than the average person.

When the jitters hit, have cough drops or hard candies handy to distract you and give your mouth something to do.

Staying hydrated also plays a big role in the quitting process. Lemon and lime water can help flush the body of the toxins inhaled during smoking, and it’s important to rid your body of that nicotine “taste” as soon as possible.

Remember, quitting smoking is a detox process. A good diet and plenty of fluids will help make that easier.

Exercise

Many patients worry that quitting smoking will lead to weight gain. It happens a lot, so talk with your health care team and develop a plan that will work for you.

Exercise is also a good distraction for when the cravings hit. Tai chi and yoga, which are meditative exercises, can help still the jittery mind.

Aerobic exercise helps you sweat, which is another way to excrete the chemicals from smoking.
Remember to check with your health care team before starting any new program and stay hydrated before, during and after exercise.

Bodywork

Quitting smoking is stressful, and there’s no sense denying that. Massage is a great way to reduce emotional and physical stress, plus it also helps improve circulation. Self-massage is also effective, according to a study published in 1999 that taught patients how to massage their hand or ear to help reduce cravings. (1) I’ll talk more about that in the acupuncture section.

Chiropractic focuses on maximizing the function of your nervous system, so it’s a great adjunct during the detox process while your nervous system adjusts to your new nicotine-free reality. Remember, your body has not only become accustomed to having nicotine, but now believes nicotine is necessary to function well, and it will take time to re-educate your nervous system.

Herbal medicine

There are quitting smoking teas you can get from Chinese import stores or your acupuncture physician. Personally, my patients report so-so results with the tea, so I just steer them in the direction of a good green tea, which has been shown to reduce oxidative damage in smoke-exposed rats. (2) Most stop smoking teas have a base of green tea anyway, so just pick one you like and learn to brew it correctly. You can drink it hot or iced, and it pairs nicely with honey and lemon. (Check out my previous article on green tea for tips).

If you are interested in herbal medicine, your acupuncture physician will most likely prescribe a formula that improves your constitution or addresses specific health problems, along with guiding you in the right direction for any nutritional supplements you may need.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture can help your body adjust to your new, smoke-free reality. There are several options to help you navigate this new reality: full-body acupuncture, NADA and ear seeds.

A full-body acupuncture session addresses constitutional complaints and acute problems. It takes longer because your acupuncture physician will talk to you before each session, check your tongue and/or pulse, and come up with a Chinese medicine differential diagnosis, before needling you. Needles are typically placed in the head, torso, arms and legs while you lay down on a treatment table. A full session typically takes around an hour.

NADA is a specific set of protocols for needling points in the ear based on whatever addictions need to be addressed — eating, smoking, alcohol, etc. Needles are placed in the ears only, based on the protocol needed, and there is no diagnosis involved, so it takes less time, too. You can read or sit in a chair during this type of treatment, to help distract you. This is a good treatment to get on your lunch break, for example.

Remember that bit about self-massage on the ear for reducing cravings? A treatment with ear seeds is a lot like a NADA protocol treatment, except you keep the seeds on your ears for about five days, and you press them and massage your ear during the day when you have cravings. You can do this treatment by itself, or with acupuncture or NADA treatments.

Last but not least, do not underestimate the power of personal support. It may not have its own pillar in Chinese medicine, but having your own cheer squad of family, friends and health care professionals is vital for your success. A study released this month found that a combination of counseling and exercise encouraged people to try quitting more often and also reduced the amount smoked, although it was the counseling that had the most effect. (3) So before you quit, ask for help and set up a reward system for yourself for every day you resist smoking. Every day you don’t smoke is a victory for your health, even if it takes you multiple tries. So don’t give up if it takes you a few tries tog et it right.

You weren’t born a smoker, and with the help of Chinese medicine, you can kick those butts to the curbs — for good.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com or call 941-766-1882.

1.) Smoking cravings are reduced by self-massage. Prev Med. 1999 Jan.
2.) Chinese green tea consumption reduces oxidative stress, inflammation and tissues damage in smoke exposed rats. Iran J Basic Med Sci. 2014 Oct.
3.) An exploratory analysis of the smoking and physical activity outcomes from a pilot randomized controlled trial of an exercise assisted reduction to stop (EARS) smoking intervention in disadvantaged groups. Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 May 11

Losing weight with Chinese Medicine

Losing weight with Chinese Medicine.

Losing weight with Chinese Medicine

A frequent question I hear from patients is, “Can acupuncture help with weight loss?” The short answer is yes, but it’s not an instant, magical fix. In the context of the five pillars of Chinese Medicine, making lifestyle changes that lead to steady, healthy weight loss is attainable, long-term goal.

Diet
The first pillar of Chinese medicine is diet, and that certainly makes sense for patients who want to lose weight. Your acupuncture physician and health care team can help monitor your food choices and make appropriate recommendations for your goals. The basic recipe for weight loss is to reduce calorie intake a little bit and make better choices for the food you eat every day. You also need to make sure you eat enough calories to cover your basic metabolic needs each day.

It’s not appropriate, or healthy, to starve yourself for weight loss. It’s also not appropriate to attempt to lose a lot of weight in a short time. If you find yourself going down that path, it’s important to tell your primary care physician and get the right support to maintain your health. Just as there are serious health concerns for people who weigh too much, there are equally serious health concerns for people who eat too little or lose weight too fast.

Balance is the mantra of Chinese Medicine, and your health care team will help you create balance in your daily food intake and teach you how to make better food choices.

Exercise
Chinese Medicine had this weight-loss thing figured out thousands of years ago. For normal, healthy individuals, diet and exercise are the two biggest keys to weight loss. Your exercise routine should be consistent and appropriate for your age and activity level. Small lifestyle changes such as parking at the far end of a parking lot to squeeze in extra walking time can add up over the long term. The mall offers a mall walkers program for people who want to exercise in an enclosed areas, and there are lots of gyms that offer equipment and classes for all levels.

On the other hand, overdoing your exercise routine has the potential to cause injury and can disrupt some bodily functions, especially if you are a female in your fertile years. Ideally, your exercise routine should be challenging but not excessive. Talk to your health care team before trying anything new.

Bodywork
Massage and chiropractic falls under the third pillar of Chinese Medicine. Massage has a great track record of reducing stress, which can contribute to poor eating habits. Massage can also help ease abdominal discomfort and encourage elimination as well as a healthy sense of body image.

Chiropractic helps your nervous system function and communicate better, and anything that improves the body’s ability to deal with stress and improve digestion is a step in the right direction.

Herbal Medicine
Although green tea is technically a food, it also counts as herbal medicine. A study published last year by the American Society for Nutrition found that green tea (along with black and oolong tea) reduced fat and inflammation. The green tea also slightly reduced food intake, although the other two teas did not have that effect. (1) A meta analysis published last year, however, found opposite results — that green tea did not offer a statistically relevant improvement in weight loss. (2). Several other studies on Pubmed also came to the same conclusion. (3-4)

Regardless of whatever side of the weight-loss fence you think green tea falls on, as a food it has enough health benefits to make it worth including in your diet as long as you don’t have any orders to the contrary from your doctor.

When it comes to over-the-counter herbal supplements for weight loss, it’s important to discuss the topic with your health care team before trying anything. Remember, there is no quick fix for weight loss when it’s done right. Quick results in weight loss are not usually in your best interest, unless you are under the care of a doctor. If you are relying on supplements as a magic pill to fix your weight, you may want to set more realistic goals with help from your health-care team.

Acupuncture
There are specific auricular (ear) points used for weight loss in acupuncture, and many other points on the body used to improve other physiological processes. The points each patient needs may overlap, but will probably not be exactly the same, since each treatment is customized for that patient. Chinese Medicine was designed to be a system of medicine that focuses on the individual’s needs and their personal expression of health or disease. This is reflected in the point prescription your acupuncture physician plans for each treatment.

If you are concerned about your weight, it’s important to talk to your doctor about your weight concerns, so that your health care team can rule out underlying conditions or medication side effects that may be contributing to your current situation. And the role of Chinese medicine in relation to weight loss is to help you accept your body exactly the way it is right now, while educating and supporting you in lifestyle changes to encourage a healthier you.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com or call 941-766-1882.

PUBMED STUDIES ABOUT GREEN TEA AND WEIGHT LOSS
1.) Green tea, black tea, and oolong tea polyphenols reduce visceral fat and inflammation in mice fed high-fat, high-sucrose obesogenic diets. J Nutr. 2014 Sep.
2.) Effect of green tea or green tea extract consumption on body weight and body composition; systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Hosp. 2014 Mar.
3.) Effects of dietary supplementation with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on weight loss, energy homeostasis, cardiometabolic risk factors and liver function in obese women: randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14.
4.) Can green tea preparations help with weight loss. Can Pharm J (Ott). 2014 May.

Addressing pain with the five pillars of Chinese Medicine

Pain is usually an unwelcome visitor. Whether pain is a short- or long-term guest in your life, by addressing your health issues with the five pillars of Chinese medicine, you can make lifestyle adjustments that encourage your body’s ability to heal and cope.

First of all, keep in mind that pain is not the problem; it’s merely a signal that something in your body needs attention. We would be in trouble if we had no way to sense or respond to pain. It’s a survival mechanism. But that’s not much comfort when you have a sprained ankle or chronic back pain. That’s why it’s never a good idea to ignore your body’s pain signals; if your symptoms are severe with quick onset or do not improve within a reasonable amount of time, then it’s important to seek medical advice and help.

Chinese medicine addresses all health issues, including pain, according to the five pillars of diet, exercise, bodywork, herbal medicine and acupuncture. Each pillar has a contribution to make in strengthening the body’s ability to heal or deal with pain.

Diet
With every bite of food you eat, you are making a choice to either fight disease, or fuel it. So when it comes to eating to reduce pain, think inflammation.

A basic anti-inflammatory diet reduces intake of dairy, red meat, sugar, coffee, alcohol and soda and increases water intake and healthy, unprocessed foods. You don’t have to switch from carnivore to vegan overnight, but making smarter food choices that reduce inflammation helps your body heal faster and better.
Remember that everything you consume will end up being the building blocks of new cells and tissue, so build wisely by eating wisely. Your health care team can help you design an eating plan that fits your specialized needs.

Exercise
Most people who are in pain limit their motion, and, most of the time, this is a smart idea. But if you are dealing with chronic pain, you may need to slowly increase your range of motion and activity level under the supervision of your health care team.

Tai chi or qi gong are gentle forms of exercise that can be adapted to any activity level and can be good places to start increasing your activity level.
Yoga is also easily adapted to different levels of activity.

The main goals of exercise are to improve a person’s strength, overall conditioning, range of motion and flexibility.

It’s not a contest. Go slow, go smart and keep going. Inactivity can compound pain issues over the long term.

Bodywork
In Chinese medicine, bodywork, or tui na, is a combination of massage and chiropractic techniques.
Here in the U.S., we leave chiropractic work to licensed DCs, but still use a variety of massage techniques to help relieve pain. This can include tui na, gua sha (a type of scraping of the skin), cupping or even Western-style energy or massage techniques for those of us who hold dual licensure.

Healthy, therapeutic touch has great potential to relieve emotional and physical discomfort and is an important tool in pain management.

Herbal medicine
When it comes to pain relief, there are more options than just aspirin. Your acupuncture physician may prescribe a Chinese herbal formula to help relieve pain, reduce inflammation and promote healing after doing a thorough intake of your current medications and supplements.

When it comes to using Chinese herbs, it’s important not to self-diagnose and buy off the Internet. For one, it may not be an appropriate choice for your individual needs.

Acupuncture physicians prescribe based on the individual’s pattern of expressing illness, not the illness itself. Second, some medications are not appropriate to combine with Chinese herbs. The quick no-go list of meds includes Warfarin, lithium and seizure-controlling medications or generic counterparts.

Acupuncture
Because acupuncture works with the nervous system, it can be an effective way to mitigate pain and retrain your brain how to deal with it. Acupuncture is used as an anesthetic in China in emergency situations or surgeries, but is more commonly used for non-emergency acute or chronic pain management here in the States.

Sometimes relief comes quickly with acupuncture. More often than not, it takes a series of sessions to make progress with pain management.

Acupuncture is not designed like a pill to be a quick fix; it’s more like going to the gym the way it stimulates the body to heal more efficiently over the long term.
If pain has overstayed its welcome in your body, Chinese medicine may give you some new tools to help.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com or call 941-766-1882.

Tai chi can tip the scales of balance back in your favor

Exercise is the second pillar in the five pillars of health in Chinese medicine. The fact that it ranks second out of five (diet, exercise, bodywork, herbal medicine and acupuncture) underscores the importance of continued movement for continued function. The old saying “if you don’t used it, you lose it” applies not only to mind, but body, too.

In Chinese medicine, the preferred forms of exercise are slow, sustained efforts that are gentle on the joints. Tai chi, a softer form of martial arts, is a broad term for a specific series of exercises that is often described as moving meditation. The slow, gentle movements make it an appropriate form of exercise for just about anyone, especially for seniors.

There have been many scientific studies about the efficacy of tai chi for various conditions; here are just a few highlights:

• A study published in 2012 in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded “Tai chi training appears to reduce balance impairments in patients with mild-to-moderate Parkinson’s disease, with additional benefits of improved functional capacity and reduced falls. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.)” (1)

• A group of 256 previously inactive adults, ages 70 to 92, were assigned to either a stretching routine or tai chi. After six months of exercise, the tai chi group had 38 falls verses 73 in the stretching group, with only 7 percent leading to injury verses 18 percent in the stretching group.
According to the study published in 2005, “the risk for multiple falls in the tai chi group was 55 percent lower than that of the stretching control group. …A three-times-per-week, 6-month tai chi program is effective in decreasing the number of falls, the risk for falling and the fear of falling, and it improves functional balance and physical performance in physically inactive persons, aged 70 years or older.” (2)

• In a study published in 2014, patients with multiple sclerosis had measurable improvements in balance, coordination, life satisfaction and mood compared to the control group of treatment as usual after six months of tai chi. While fatigue worsened in the control group during that time, the tai chi group had a fairly stable fatigue level. Their fatigue did not improve, but it did not worsen like the control group. (3)

• A 2004 study of patients with stable congestive heart failure found improvements in quality of life, distance walked, decreased serum B-type natriuretic peptide levels and a possible improvement in peak oxygen uptake with the addition of a tai chi exercise program to standard care. (4)

• A 2009 study evaluated short form tai chi for the following criteria: “Dynamic standing balance evaluated by the center of gravity (COG) excursion during self-initiated body leaning in 4 directions, standing equilibrium evaluated in sensory challenged conditions and functional mobility assessed by Timed-up-and-go score.” The results showed that tai chi improved everything, including vestibular integration, but not the timed-up-and-go score. (5)

• A 2008 study of 15 asthmatic children found that tai chi can improve pulmonary function in the short term, and it deserved longer, follow-up studies. (6)

• Female senior cancer survivors who were taught tai chi verses a control group who received health education had significantly lower systolic blood pressure and cortisol (stress) levels. (7)

The jury is still out on some alleged benefits
Can tai chi affect blood sugar? There are conflicting studies about that. A 2009 study states that 31 test subjects who completed a tai chi exercise program had improvements in fasting glucose, quality of life and performed more self care activities than the control group. (8)

Another study reports the improvements on insulin resistance and HbA(1c) were related to losing fat, not the specific tai chi exercise, but suggests a more intense form of tai chi that burns more calories might be effective for blood sugar control. (9)

An overall look at Pub Med articles will reveal conflicting studies on cardiovascular effects, too, but most studies trend in the direction that tai chi improves balance as well as reduces risk factors for chronic disease.

How do I get started?
Personal instruction is always the best method to learn a new form of exercise, especially if you anticipate needing adjustments for your current ability level. Check with your local gym or community calendar for classes. There are plenty of DVDs and YouTube videos for home practice, too.
Check in with your health care team before you get started, and get ready to bring balance back to body, mind and spirit.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com or call 941-766-1882.

The tongue tells tales of your current health

Go ahead, stick your tongue out at me. I won’t be offended. Didn’t brush your tongue? Even better.

A patient’s tongue doesn’t lie; it provides valuable clues to internal health and is an important part of the physical exam in Chinese Medicine.

The tongue, like the ear, is a map of sorts to the body, as well as the only muscle of the body you can actually see. The front of the tongue represents the upper jiao, or the upper third portion of the body from the chest up. The middle of the tongue tells about the status of the internal organs, and the back third of the tongue corresponds to the pelvic region, or lower jiao. By looking at the color of the tongue, its shape, size, the coat and any markings on the tongue, an acupuncture physician can assess or confirm diagnostic signs or symptoms in a patient.

Stressed out and anxious? The tip of your tongue may be red and pointed. Is your tongue scalloped on the sides? You may be worrying too much and clenching your teeth.

In Chinese Medicine, an acupuncturist likes to see a thin white coat on a healthy pink tongue. A thicker coat can indicate problems with Phlegm (a type of pathogenic factor in Chinese Medicine) and no coat can indicate Yin Deficiency (a term that loosely translates to a lack of bodily fluids). A pale tongue can indicate Blood Deficiency (which is similar to, but not exactly like anemia in western medical terms) and a red tongue can indicate that Heat (our term for inflammation) is present.

A popular health clue circulated on the Internet reminds people to look for a deviated tongue as a possible sign of stroke. This can be a powerful clue when combined with other signs of stroke such as slurred speech or one-sided paralysis, but it’s not the only reason for a deviated tongue. I used to freak out my classmates whenever they looked at my tongue. The minute I stuck out my tongue, the next question they asked was about history of strokes. Nope. One of the side effects of TMJ for me is a deviated tongue, and when I get regular massage on my neck, scalp and jaw, it straightens out temporarily. So even in tongue diagnosis, there are no absolutes. But it is a good baseline indicator of health.

If you are wondering what your body is up to on the inside, stick your tongue out and just look in the mirror.

Nicole Noles is an acupuncture physician at New Hope Chiropractic in Port Charlotte. She has bachelor’s degrees in alternative medicine and professional health sciences, with a master’s in traditional Chinese medicine. Email her at nnoles88@gmail.com.